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This Man was the ‘Founder’ of Today’s Exchange

On July 25, the Exchange will celebrate its 124th anniversary of keeping troops and their families ready and resilient.

Come along with the Exchange Post this month on a journey through time¬† with regular features about our organization’s unique history of serving those who serve. Browse the searchable, downloadable Exchange history Flickr album.

First, we start with the man who is credited with founding the post exchange system.

 

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10 Comments

  1. Mike King on July 1, 2019 at 7:01 pm

    Interesting that the original historical rational still exists.

    • Steve Smith on July 1, 2019 at 7:17 pm

      Mike:

      Thank you so much for writing to your Exchange Post.

      Let’s keep the conversation going. Does anybody else out there have comments about this Exchange history article? If so, type your thoughts in the comment box and hit enter.

      C’mon . . . we want to read them.

      Steve Smith
      Editor, The Exchange Post

  2. Gary L. Smith on July 1, 2019 at 8:26 pm

    At the NW entrance to Yellowstone National Park, one of the buildings that was built in 1905 was the Post Exchange, replacing an earlier structure that served the same purpose and was built in 1894, so maybe one of the oldest exchanges in US military history is located in the world’s very first National Park. The park was established in 1872, but Congress removed it from Department of the Interior control in 1883 and placed it under the War Department. General Sheridan sent soldiers there and a fort, originally named Fort Sheridan, was constructed starting in 1886. Later the name was changed to Fort Yellowstone. The Army was responsible for the park until 1918, when the National Park Service was established, the Army left and the Exchange ceased operation. Visitors to the park headquarters at Mammoth Hot Springs will find that building is still in use, although no longer an Exchange. There was a plaque denoting it’s previous purpose the last time I visited. An image of the building is available on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Yellowstone

    • Steve Smith on July 2, 2019 at 1:05 pm

      Mr. Smith:

      Thank you for writing to your Exchange Post! A picture of the Fort Yellowstone PX to which you refer is located in the searchable, downloadable Exchange history Flickr album.

      Here’s the link to the entire album:
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/exchangeassoc/albums/72157669272401562

      More than 700 historical pictures dating back to the Civil War.

      I’m also the Exchange historian in addition to being the Exchange Post editor.

      Let’s keep the conversation going! Does anybody out there have thoughts they would like to share about AAFES history? If so, type your comments in the Comment box and hit Enter.

      C’mon . . . we want to read them.

      Steve Smith
      Editor, The Exchange Post

  3. Cheryl Beasley on July 2, 2019 at 12:28 pm

    It would really be interesting to read his original report.

    • Steve Smith on July 2, 2019 at 12:57 pm

      Ms. Beasley:

      Thank you for writing to your Exchange Post!

      Yes indeed, it would be interesting to read his original report. I’d love to get my hands on it for the archives.

      Steve Smith
      Editor, The Exchange Post

    • Marla on July 3, 2019 at 1:01 pm

      I agree with Cheryl…very curious to read his report. This was a great story.

      • Steve Smith on July 3, 2019 at 1:03 pm

        Thanks Marla! If I could ever get my hands on that report, too!

        Steve Smith
        Editor, The Exchange Post

  4. Scott Laschkewitsch on July 2, 2019 at 1:11 pm

    Thanks for sharing this enlightening story Steve! I’m new to the Exchange, and it’s cool to learn about it’s historical roots and richness! Major Schwan was quite the visionary! What an awesome and enduring legacy! (I wonder if his heritage is also connected in any way to the family of the Schwan Food Company)

    • Steve Smith on July 2, 2019 at 1:48 pm

      Mr. Laschkewitsch:

      Welcome to the Exchange. Thank you for writing to your Exchange Post.

      If you really want to bone up on Exchange history, check out the searchable, downloadable Exchange history Flickr album.

      Here’s the link:

      https://www.flickr.com/photos/exchangeassoc/albums/72157669272401562

      Again, thanks for writing!

      Steve Smith
      Editor, The Exchange Post

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