Celebrating 127 Years of Service

Wewerearewill behere for you!

A SPECIAL MESSAGE FROM

Tom Shull

DIRECTOR/CEO, EXCHANGE

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EXPLORE

Exchange

HISTORY

Interactive Timeline

Legacy of Mission-Essential Service

Around the world, Exchange associates have served customers with tax-free goods, food and services through world wars, regional conflicts, natural disasters, military exercises deep in the jungles and high on mountaintops, and at sites of raging wildfires. The Nation’s hero Warfighters at the tip of the spear in Eastern Europe, Southwest Asia, the Middle East, South Korea and elsewhere depend upon the mission-essential Exchange to be wherever they are to keep them ready and resilient.

Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, more than 4,800 associates have deployed—some more than once—to Afghanistan, Iraq and other area countries to care for our heroes.

The Exchange also cares for military families, retirees and all honorably discharged Veterans by providing the items and services they need.

No other retailer has such a rich and storied history of serving those who serve.

Read about the Exchange’s devoted associates who left the safety and comfort of their homes to to take care of the men and women who protect our freedoms.

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Their Stories

ABOUT THE EXCHANGE

A series honoring the Exchange’s 127 years of family serving family with new stories shared daily.

Hafeeza McCullough

Hafeeza McCullough

JBLM

“The program taught me to always seek out information on my own,” she said. “I’ve stayed committed to the company. Out of my class, I’m the 1% who made a career with the Exchange.”

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Chris Gish

Chris Gish

Whiteman Air Force Base

“Working with firearms sounded like a great job, and it is,” he said. “I had so many regular customers that I built relationships with them; they came in every day, sometimes just to talk.”

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Henry Robinson

Henry “Robbie” Robinson

Fort Meade

Fifteen years ago, when Fort Meade and Aberdeen Proving Ground were consolidated, Robinson got a call from his mentor, John Shiroky, who worked in services at Aberdeen PG. “We’d meet at vending expos and classes, and I’d always say, ‘We’d make a good team,’ and he’d say, ‘You’re right!’” Robinson said.

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Robert Tackett

Robert Tackett

Fort Leavenworth

Robert TackettExpress store manager, Fort Leavenworth

“It was one of the most rewarding experiences of my career,” Tackett said. “I really enjoyed the camaraderie with fellow associates there, and also with the customers—they’re so appreciative of you being there.”

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Christi Cook

Christi Cook

Eglin AFB

Christi Cook, office assistant, Eglin Air Force Base Exchange

“My husband was active-duty Air Force,” Cook said. “I applied for the job with the Exchange at Okinawa. I got an interview and was offered a job at the Shoppette.”

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Wally Keinlen

Wally Kienlen

Randolph Air Force Base

Wallace “Wally” Kienlen’s last assignment in the Air Force was in Vietnam when the U.S. was closing bases near the end of the war. After serving 23 years in the security police, he retired from the military and worked as an instructor at a few bases in the States, then as a military club manager in Germany for 20 years.

When Kienlen relocated near Randolph Air Force Base in 1995 to be close to his daughter Patricia, he needed a job, so he started working as a janitor at the Exchange, but he knew he wanted to do something more.

“As a military club manager and security policeman, you deal with people; that’s want I like—interacting and working with people,” Kienlen said

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Larry Falk

Larry Falk

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

Chanute Air Force Base, Illinois, holds a lot of memories for Larry Falk, a courier at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base who has worked at the Exchange for 46 years.

When he met his future wife Evelyn, they both worked at the Exchange at Chanute. And that’s also where his father met his mother as they both worked at the Exchange there, too.

“I was raised military and I was raised Exchange,” Falk said. “I’ve known the Exchange all my life, since I was 8 years old.”

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Aloysius Carino

Offutt AFB

Aloysius Carino, an annex supervisor at Offutt Air Force Base, wanted to follow in the footsteps of his father and brother by joining the military, but he couldn’t enlist due to an injury. So he did the next best thing: he joined the Exchange.

Carino has worked at Offutt for 24 years. He started at the main Exchange and was there for ten years as a sales associate, cashier, customer service leader and store operations associate. Then he was a shift manager at the Military Clothing and Sales store for five years and an Express shift manager for three years.

He remembers the advice his former manager, Cindy Marino (now retired), gave to him.

“She said that working at an Express store is a great experience because you get hands-on training and learn about all aspects of running a store,” Carino said. “I miss her, she was fun to work with.”

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Anthony Mancha

Anthony Mancha Jr.

Waco Distribution Center

Army Veteran and second-generation Exchange associate Anthony Mancha Jr. ended his 20-year military career as a retired staff sergeant looking for his next opportunity.

“When I first got out of the military, my dad suggested I apply for a position at the Exchange,” Mancha said.

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Amaryllis and Anais Goburn

Fort Riley

More than 18 years ago, Amaryllis Goburn started as a softlines associate at the Vogelweh Exchange, working on the weekends while attending the University of Maryland-Manheim Campus in Germany.

Amaryllis’ father, Sgt. Aurelio Goburn, served in the Marine Corps for six years. When his time in uniform ended, he worked in his home country Panama for the Department of Defense—transferring with the department to Germany in 1999.

While living off-post in Germany with their parents, Amaryllis and her four younger siblings attended Kaiserslautern American High School. Her three younger brothers later worked for the Exchange as associates in Power Zone, hardlines and the men’s department. Her little sister, Anais, began her Exchange career in the food court.

“She always talked about how much she liked her job,” Anais said. “We just followed in her footsteps.”

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Hampton and Culp

Carolina Hampton and Roxanne Culp

Patrick Space Force Base

“I remarried and moved to Germany in the 1980s. I started working in Military Clothing sales at Rhein Air Base,” Hampton said. Her daughter-in- law, Roxanne, began at the Exchange in 2006.

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Rochelle Tolentino

Rochelle Tolentino

Puerto Rico Exchange

“After graduating from Old Dominion University with a bachelor of science in international business, I applied to the Exchange’s college trainee program,” Tolentino said.

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Angela Davila

Angela Davila

Los Angeles Consolidated Exchange

“The Exchange was a good fit because I wanted to continue serving my country, but still raise my children,” Davila said. “The Exchange gave me that opportunity.”

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Leazel and Betty

Betty Bramley and Leazel Williams

Moody AFB and Seymour Johnson AFB

Betty is an Express shift manager at Moody Air Force Base; her daughter Leazel is a main store manager at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base.

“After serving more than 25 years in the Air Force, my husband Roy retired in 2008 at Ramstein and we settled near Moody AFB,” Bramley said. “My father-in-law, Ronald Bramley, was a Vietnam Veteran who served 12 years in the Air Force.”

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David Campbell

David Campbell

Kadena BX

Campbell would like to work for the Exchange for at least 10 more years in Okinawa and achieve a supervisory position, but for now he is content.

“The best thing about working for the Exchange is knowing that I am able to support our service members with the products they need to stay healthy,” Campbell said. “Plus, the Exchange provides me the ability to stay here in Okinawa until I am ready to return to the States.”

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Brian Greene

Brian Greene

Luke Air Force Base

Brian Greene, stockroom manager at Luke Air Force Base, is a military brat who celebrated his 40th year with the Exchange this year—and he spent it all at the same place after traveling around the world when his father, Donald, was in the Air Force.

“I was born in Maine, at Kittery Naval Station,” Greene said. “I have been around military bases my entire life—Florida, Colorado and Arizona are a few more. I have three siblings and we were all born in different states. I went to high school on ‘The Rock’ – Kadena Air Force Base, Okinawa, Japan from 1977-80. Go Kubasaki Dragons!”

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Getgasorn

Katherine Getgasorn and Karah Zinski

Fort Campbell

Katherine Getgasorn, the Burger King facility manager at Fort Campbell, grew to embrace the Exchange mission when she was a young military spouse in Germany.

“While away from home, I realized the unity and commitment to family in the military, especially overseas, and I became more aware of that the longer I worked at the Exchange,”  Getgasorn said.

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Joyce and Patrick Davidson

Joyce and Patrick Davidson

Fort Leavenworth

“Family serving family” is more than a workplace core value to Fort Leavenworth Exchange associates Joyce and Patrick Davidson—it’s a way of life.

When the family patriarch, Chief Petty Officer Patrick Davidson, retired from the Navy in 1997 after 20 years of service, the Davidson family decided to return home to Kansas.

“We’re originally from Kansas City, but we settled in Leavenworth to be closer to the military base and our family,” Joyce said.

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Jerry Mills

Jerry Mills

Ft. Knox

What’s in a name(tape)? If you or someone you know were in the military in the past 25 years, there’s a chance that Jerry Mills made the name tapes you wore on your uniforms. He’s a foreman at the Exchange Name Tape Plant at Fort Knox, which makes the name tapes that the Exchange sells to service members in all branches of service.

But crafting name tapes wasn’t Mills’ first job at the Exchange. He’s been serving customers at Fort Knox for 45 years.

“I started working as a temporary hire in the main store stockroom at Christmas,” said Mills. “I was still living with my parents, and I wanted a car and had to pay for it and the insurance. Then I was hired full time at a gas station. I worked at three Exchange gas stations for 22 years, then switched to the Name Tape Plant because all the service/filling stations were closing.”

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Lois Bell

Lois Bell

Barksdale Air Force Base

Lois Bell, a customer experience associate at the Barksdale Air Force Base Exchange, has a lot of memories from her 40 years at the Exchange–and she’s still making them.

“One day, a young man waiting in line said to me, ‘Every time I see you, I just want to give you a hug,’” said Bell, who turned 90 years old last year. ‘”You remind me of my grandmother.’”

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