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Chasing 26.2 marathon training

MARATHON TRAINING

PERFORMANCE TRACKING

Select week number to follow my journey to race day.

Find your starting line.

My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

TRAINING RECAP

17-14 WEEKS OUT

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13-10 WEEKS OUT

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9-7 WEEKS OUT

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6-4 WEEKS OUT

3-1 WEEKS OUT

POST- RACE RECAP

17 WEEKS OUT

17

A STARTING LINE

Some journeys are meant to be taken together. Join me on this journey as I document the road to my first full marathon in Chasing 26.2.

 

They say your first marathon is an automatic PB (Personal Best)— which means each run from here on out these runs will be a new PR for me. I kicked off my first long-distance run last week, logging in 8 miles at an easy pace of 10:00 - 10:30 minutes a mile. A 90-minute run used to be very common for me as a soccer player, so from here on out, it’s uncharted territory and the mileage will only increase.

 

I’ve constructed and tailored my original strength training schedule to account for three running days per week. These days will be separated by cross-training, weight training, and functional training workouts with a secondary focus on movements to be a better runner.

 

My schedule through December looks like this:

 

Roy’s Marathon Training Schedule

Monday: Cross-Training/Recovery

Tuesday: Endurance w/Recovery

Wednesday: Cross-Training/Recovery

Thursday: Endurance w/Recovery

Friday: Rest Day

Saturday: Cross-Training/Recovery

Sunday: Endurance

 

On this journey, I’ll  share my  view on what motivates me; what techniques and tips I’ve gained; lessons learned; the high points and low points of training; and a full progress report with stats as my running increases.

 

Tracking my performance

17 weeks out

 

ENDURANCE RUN : 1-HOUR EASY-PACE RUN

ENDURANCE RUN : 1-HOUR EASY-PACE RUN

 

LONG DISTANCE RUN - 8 MILES

Running Vocabulary

Starting a running journey can be tricky, including new experiences and running vocabulary. Here are some running terms that will come in handy.

Vocabulary via Runner’s World

My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 165 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.9

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

16 WEEKS OUT

16

SETTING GOOD HABITS

After easing into this new three day a week running program, I’ve realized that not all runs will be easy, but every run will have a purpose. Whether I am working on speed, endurance, or strength, each run should be approached with a different mindset to run with a purpose.

 

These first two weeks will be focused on getting my body acclimated to running; time on my feet, my run cadence, monitoring my run pace and heart rate. Setting good habits are going to be key in building a solid foundation as I train and prepare for this marathon.

 

Good Habits to build on:

 

Set a variety of goals

  • Short Term – These are day-to-day and weekly tasks that you must accomplish to reach your annual and life range target goals.
  • Long Term

 

Dynamic Warm-Up routine before a run

  • Dynamic warm-ups are great for priming and preparing your joints and muscles for intense work.
    • Leg Swings
    • Skips
    • Single Leg Hip Rotations
    • Squats
    • Lunges
    • Inchworms

 

Stretching and foam rolling

  • Talking recovery habits, stretching will help with flexibility and . Foam rolling can help reduce any pain you may have and muscle soreness. Massaging the muscle can increase blood flow and oxygen to the tissue.

 

Strength Training

  • Resistance and/or functional training is beneficial in building power and speed and in turn aids in proper running form which can make you a more efficient and well-rounded athlete.

 

Eat Healthy

  • Building and maintaining life-long healthy eating habits is crucial whether you are a runner or not. What you consume before a run can influence your performance or training.

 

Drink Lots of Water

  • Replenishing fluids expelled after running or training is a crucial part of any workout program. Aim to drink at least 36 ounces of water per day and drink more if you feel like needing more.

 

Roy’s Marathon Training Schedule

Monday: Cross-Training/Recovery

Tuesday: Endurance w/Recovery

Wednesday: Cross-Training/Recovery

Thursday: Endurance w/Recovery

Friday: Rest Day

Saturday: Cross-Training/Recovery

Sunday: Endurance

 

Tracking my performance

16 weeks out

1-HOUR ENDURANCE RUN

ENDURANCE RUN : 1-HOUR EASY-PACE RUN

 

LONG DISTANCE RUN - 9 MILES


My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 165 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.9

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

15 WEEKS OUT

15

DEVELOP CONSISTENCY

By this time, three weeks into the running program, I’ve approached training with a mentality of how much effort I put into training, will be the outcome of what I will get out of training.

 

One major key to success in most habits is consistency. It’s important to build a foundation of consistency to start gauging improvements and/or struggles. With repetition, we can create a benchmark for our processes and down the road, we can start to analyze the small additions to our training such as stride length, nutrition and how our body breaks down different foods pre-running, pace per mile, running gels to help sustain energy, clothing used and footwear that we wear.

 

I’ve picked up some new gear to help with training. Here are my running essentials that I’ve gathered at the early stages of this marathon training.

 

Shoes

Nike Zoom Pegasus 35

My low mileage and recovery shoes have been the Nike Zoom Pegasus 35. Personally, I like the comfort, shape, the forward momentum when stepping and the durability.

 

Find these shoes and more at shopmyexchange.com

 

Nike Zoom Fly 3

Now that my running has increased, I’ve decided to train in the Nike Zoom Fly 3 based on the comfort and durability. It has a soft and springy midsole provides highly responsive cushioning and houses a full-length carbon-fiber plate that delivers a propulsive sensation.

 


 

Socks

Feetures Elite Light Cushion Mini Crew Socks

Believe it or not, what you wear to protect your feet to help absorb the impact matters. Everybody’s comfort and preference will differ, however most running stored will have a great selection of brands and types varying from ultra-light, light and a medium cushion.

 

I’ve responded well with the Feetures Elite Light Cushion Mini Crew Socks.

 


 

Shorts + Shirt

Nike Dri-FIT Flex Stride 7” Running Shorts

A variety of shorts to your preference and brands are available.

 

I’ve noticed that every bit of resistance that you can remove from your clothing helps when running 2+ hours long, so a non-baggy short and shirt helps with movement as well as choosing materials that move sweat away from your skin to the outer surface of the fabric, where it evaporates.

 

Find this athletic apparel and more at shopmyexchange.com

 

*Note that I will be exploring winter options in the months ahead as the temperature cools off outside.

 


 

Headwear

Choose headwear that helps protect your head from the elements and also provides comfort, that’s lightweight breathability and has moisture wicking technology.

 

Find headwear and more at shopmyexchange.com

 


 

Sports Watch/Fitness Tracker

Garmin Forerunner 35

Being able to track you current stats during a run as well as monitor heart rate and progress is important. Every run has a purpose and you will want to track these runs to help stay on top of your training program.

 

I’m currently using the Garmin Forerunner 35 which allows you to monitor running stats and syncs a full recap of saved runs to your phone as a stored running log.

 

Find fitness trackers and more at shopmyexchange.com

 


 

Comfortable Drink Carrier

Nathan Peak Hydration Waist Pak

To help with hydration, find a water bottle that can fit your needs. Handhelds, belts with bottles and a waist pak are a few options that can aid with running on the go.

 

I’ve found that I like to keep my hands free and wear the Nathan Peak Hydration Waist Pak which also holds my phone for pairing with my earbuds.

 


 

Complex-Carbohydrate Energy Drink

Via Runner’s World:

 

A professional sports drink is the best way to take in large quantities of easily digestible energy. You can use it before training (particularly useful for pre-breakfast runs); during sessions lasting more than 90 minutes; and in between speed reps to help you stay stronger for longer. Half an hour after training is the key window for restoring muscle glycogen and fluid, and a sports drink is a convenient way of doing both.

 

Good sports drinks are made with carbohydrates - usually maltodextrin - which pack more energy than carbohydrates such as sucrose and fructose. Some also contain minerals to speed water absorption and replace what you sweated out. Whether you go for powder or a ready-mixed version, the real key is simply to find a brand that you like drinking.

 

Tracking my performance

15 weeks out

ENDURANCE RUN : 1-HOUR EASY-PACE RUN

 

LONG DISTANCE RUN - 12 MILES


My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 161.6 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.6

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

14 WEEKS OUT

14

LEARN TO FOCUS

I understand that not all weeks and workloads will be the same. With responsibilities outside of work, I’ve found myself prioritizing runs and learning to squeeze them in when time permits. This week’s challenges consisted of extended work hours and travels to San Antonio, Texas for Be Fit coverage which forced me to stay focused on my goals of training, even if that meant changing up my running time and location.

 

Remember, If your schedule does not match your training schedule, make adjustments to your training schedule to fit your needs.

 

Stay focused.

If you’re tired, figure out why. Fatigue is normal as I’m learning as training progresses, but remember to support yourself in all other aspects to make sure you are setting yourself up for the best possible training sessions.

 

Stay focused.

I’ve also ran into challenging runs that were just terrible. Sometimes runs bring up different variables such as weather conditions, footwear, daily thoughts and moods, and sometimes there’s no reason at all. Move on to the next one.

 

Stay focused.

If you lack motivation, look for motivation. This may be your surroundings, friends, athletes, or even a short run. Again, every run has a purpose and this may be where you find your motivation. I’m currently drawing inspiration by following Eliud Kipchoge’s journey to break the 2 hour marathon barrier. As Eliud say’s, No Human Is Limited.

 

Roy’s Marathon Training Schedule

Monday: Cross-Training/Recovery

Tuesday: Endurance w/Recovery

Wednesday: Cross-Training/Recovery

Thursday: Endurance w/Recovery

Friday: Rest Day

Saturday: Cross-Training/Recovery

Sunday: Endurance

Tracking my performance

14 weeks out

ENDURANCE RUN : 1-HOUR EASY-PACE RUN

12 MILE ENDURANCE RUN

My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 161.0 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.5

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

13 WEEKS OUT

13

BUILD UP STRENGTH

As I continue to build off of each week, one factor that has been a consistent staple of training is weight training. Although this can seem counterintuitive to some, the added benefits of strength work can prevent injuries and strengthen muscles to help you run faster by improving neuromuscular coordination and power as well as improving running economy by encouraging a strong form, posture, and stride efficiency.

 

To help with running, I’ve switched my focus to build strength and power versus a goal to increase muscle mass. With the amount of miles that I’m running weekly, my chances of putting on muscle mass are pretty low.

 

Here are 10 training exercises that I regularly incorporate into my lifting days to help build up strength.

 

Upper Body

Complete 3 sets of each exercise

 

Pushups – 15 reps

Bent-Over Rows – 12 Reps

Reverse Fly – 12 Reps

 

Core

Complete 3 sets of each exercise

 

Plank - 30-60 sec

Leg Raise - 10 reps

Russian Twist - 10 reps/per side

 

Lower Body

Complete 3 sets of each exercise

 

Deadlifts – 12 reps

Lunge – 8-12 reps

Single-Leg Bridge – 15 reps/per leg

Box Jump – 12 reps

Tracking my performance

13 weeks out

 

1-HOUR INTERVAL RUN

 

13 MILE ENDURANCE RUN


My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.8 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.3

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

12 WEEKS OUT

12

PUSH ENDURANCE

Practice. Patience. Persistence. If you would have told when before I started this training that would be running 20 plus miles every week, I would have not believed it. If we bring up vocabulary from week 1, you will remember running techniques such as tempo, interval, sprints, and hills to help gradually adapt to the mileage that I am slowly building up too.

 

These training techniques are helping to increase my endurance along with practicing a running form that feels comfortable for me.

 

Running is easy—just lace up your shoes and start moving at a faster pace than a walk. But having proper running form? That’s a lot easier said than done.

 

I’ve come across a great article that gives tips to help achieve proper running form:

 

RUNNING FORM  (Click Here)

 

Trust the process and the running program that you’ve planned out and you will find that your endurance will increase and you will get stronger and faster with time.

Tracking my performance

12 weeks out

1-HOUR TEMPO RUN

14 MILE ENDURANCE RUN

My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.8 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.3

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

11 WEEKS OUT

11

PICK UP THE PACE

Go faster and longer. Some of the earliest advice I received during training was to focus on my breathing technique and cadence. But what exactly did that mean? Do I breath through my mouth? Through my nose and out my mouth as I’ve always heard? It turns out that bringing awareness to your breathing builds more efficiency, a steadier pace, and a calmer mind.

 

Six weeks into training and my breathing cadence had finally come natural to me without thinking; filling up my diaphragm with air, expelling through my mouth as I match my run stride with each breath.

 

The team over at Runner’s World breaks it down like this:

BREATHING CADENCE (Click Here)

 

Breathing Basics: Slow Down and Belly Breathe

The most common reason new runners gasp for air? They haven’t regulated their response of “fight or flight” to “rest and digest.”

This impacts their heart and lungs enough that they can’t run without reaching their ventilatory threshold, the point at which you can’t breathe deeply or quickly enough to fulfill your body’s demand for oxygen, says running coach Erik Bies, D.P.T., M.S., a physical therapist and clinic director at Movement Systems in Seattle. Once you near this point, your body’s stress response kicks in, causing you to panic and struggle even more.

To avoid this, slow down at first. Stick to a pace that allows you to speak a few words or sentences (throw in walk breaks every few minutes if you have to). Jordan recommends inhaling through your nose and out through your mouth for the best gas exchange at an easy pace.

With a few weeks of consistent training, your body adapts in ways that increase your ventilatory threshold—for instance, your muscles sprout new blood vessels, says Kyle Barnes, Ph.D., assistant professor of exercise science at Grand Valley State University.

 

The Intermediate Trick: Focus and Find Rhythm

From there, it’s time to take focused breathing on the move with rhythmic patterns. Gracey recommends starting by inhaling for two counts, then exhaling for two, a pattern called 2:2 breathing. This will help you pace yourself better—the steadier you’re breathing, the less likely you are to go out too hard—and ensure a steady flow of oxygen to your muscles.

Try it walking first, then on easy runs, beginning with one minute at a time every mile or two and gradually increasing the duration of your focus. As you grow more comfortable with focused breathing, you can use it for faster runs, such as intervals and tempo. Paying attention to your breath can help you gauge your pace and tolerate the discomfort of speedy paces, so you can improve your ventilatory threshold even further, Bies says.

Start by using 2:2 breathing during strides—15- to 20-second bursts of faster running—or 30-second hill repeats, Gracey recommends. Eventually, you can extend the rhythm throughout longer intervals—say, faster half-mile or mile repetitions.

On easy runs, try 3:3 or 4:4 breathing, she says. Others recommend experimenting with a longer inhale than exhale—2:1 for faster running, 4:3 or 3:2 for easier running—to see what feels more natural for you. Doing so may better distribute the impact across both sides of your body.

Many new runners breathe from their chest instead of their diaphragm, further limiting their oxygen intake. Combat this with belly breathing. For five minutes in the morning or before you run, lie down and place your hand on your stomach. Take slow, deep breaths that lift your hand as you inhale and sink it as you exhale. Once you’re comfortable on the ground, try taking belly breaths when walking, then running.

 

An Advanced Hack: Count and Train Your Diaphragm

During workouts and races, Gracey uses 2:2 breathing paired with mentally tallying her strides. The first four-count inhalation and exhalation is one. The second is two, and so on. She counts from one to 100, then starts over again. “It gives me small goals to work toward,” she says, “and keeps me focused and present.”

Counting breaths proves especially useful in races like the Boston Marathon, which features varying terrain, she says, because it’s harder to breathe on uphills and easier on downhills. Keeping your respiration steady rather than freaking out about numbers on your watch ensures you’ll net out around your goal pace. While consistent running strengthens your breathing muscles, you can take them to boot camp for a bigger boost using a device like POWERbreathe. “Essentially, it’s like dumbbells for your diaphragm,” Barnes says. Experts call this inspiratory muscle training. Start with two sets of 30 breaths at two different times of the day, using a resistance that’s challenging but that you can complete with good form. (Think: breathing from your belly, not shrugging your shoulders or straining your neck.)

Tracking my performance

11 weeks out

 

70 MIN. INTERVAL RUN

1-HOUR ENDURANCE RUN

 

INDOOR RUN-SUBSTITUTE

 


My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.8 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.3

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

10 WEEKS OUT

10

TIME TO EVOLVE

Mental and physical changes

During training, everyone experiences highs and lows. When you hit a rough patch, stay focused and try remember why you started.

 

What I’ve noticed during marathon training is both the physical and mental changes that have come with pushing my body where it has not been before. For example, physically, I’ve seen an increase in strength in my bones, knees, ankles, and legs. A loss in body weight and fat percentage which has me averaging out in the 9 percent range. These are the most recognizable, physical changes, however, it’s what you gain and battle with mentally during running training that has me most impressed.

 

The amount of mental strength and fortitude that builds up over this time has greatly increased. It’s when I feel that my body says no more, my mind overtakes the feeling and truly yells to keep pushing forward. One step at a time. I’ve seen changes in the way the brain makes it more resistant to stress, and It’s improved moods and boosts the ability to focus.

Tracking my performance

10 weeks out

1-HOUR INTERVAL RUN

16 MILE ENDURANCE RUN

My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

9 WEEKS OUT

09

LOOK AHEAD

One of the toughest lessons I’ve learned during this training season is to listen to your body. Knowing when to push and knowing when to run smart and ease off. This week I learned the hard way, picking up my first minor setback; an injury to my upper calf near the back of the Knee.

 

I realize that time off my feet this week was needed to let my body rest which allowed me to give attention and treatment to what I now know is a strain on the medial head of the gastrocnemius.

 

With a few days off from training, I decided to see a doctor specialized in running and sports medicine to analyze my injury and get me back to training. Rest is key to the process as well as treatment to fully recover, so this week is all about rehabilitation to maintain overall condition to safely stay fit and in shape during the healing process.

Tracking my performance

9 weeks out

 

60 MIN. STATIONARY BIKE - ALTERNATIVE

 

60 MIN. SWIMMING - ALTERNATIVE


My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.1 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.3

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

9 WEEKS OUT

09

LOOK AHEAD

One of the toughest lessons I’ve learned during this training season is to listen to your body. Knowing when to push and knowing when to run smart and ease off. This week I learned the hard way, picking up my first minor setback; an injury to my upper calf near the back of the Knee.

 

I realize that time off my feet this week was needed to let my body rest which allowed me to give attention and treatment to what I now know is a strain on the medial head of the gastrocnemius.

 

With a few days off from training, I decided to see a doctor specialized in running and sports medicine to analyze my injury and get me back to training. Rest is key to the process as well as treatment to fully recover, so this week is all about rehabilitation to maintain overall condition to safely stay fit and in shape during the healing process.

Tracking my performance

9 weeks out

 

60 MIN. STATIONARY BIKE - ALTERNATIVE

 

60 MIN. SWIMMING - ALTERNATIVE


My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.1 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.3

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

8 WEEKS OUT

08

RUNNING RESET

Before re-engaging with my training program, I want to introduce low risk and low impact movements to minimize the risk of additional harm. This week kicked off with listening to my body and realizing that I was not one-hundred percent ready to run, but I am able to train differently to maintain my strength and conditioning.

 

I turned to biking and swimming to meet requirements and mimic my long distance runs. I spent an hour on each alternative movement to help with conditioning, strength, cardiovascular endurance.

 

Pairing your training with the proper nutrition has been as important as the miles you eat up. Your nutritional choices will have an impact not only race day, but also on increasing your energy levels, preventing dehydration and optimizing your recovery time during these crucial weeks ahead.

 

What I’ve done is paid close attention to upping my protein intake to help build muscle, recover quicker and help with injury. I’ve incorporated a mobile application called MyFitnessPal to keep a diary my daily food intake and which gives you the options to input your breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack, exercise, and water. From this, you can see your total calories, nutrients, and macros daily.

 

Hydration has been a focal point when I’m training as well as when I’m not training.  Runner’s World states, “Fluids regulate your body temperature, flush out damaged cells and ensure that your joints are adequately lubricated. When you’re actually hitting the road, a good rule of thumb is to drink 3-4 sips of fluid for every 15–20 minutes you’re running, or to drink to thirst. Every body is different, but as a guideline you shouldn't exceed 600ml of water per hour running.”

 

Learning how my body responds to what I eat before a training session within 30-60 minutes, has been a learning curve, but is needed to fuel me through these sessions. Ideally, you want a balance or proteins and carbohydrates such as bread topped with peanut butter and slices of a banana for example.

Tracking my performance

8 weeks out

1-HOUR ENDURANCE RUN

My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.1 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.3

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

7 WEEKS OUT

07

EMBRACE AHEAD

Recovery. Bouncing back after a minor setback can be tough and frustrating. Knowing that these things are a part of the process to test you and make you a better athlete. This is where my mindset is at.

 

Continuing with the plan of training and taking this week one step at a time, I am evaluating each run slowly so that I can work my way back up to the prescribed distance that is on my training schedule.

Tracking my performance

7 weeks out

 

15 MIN EASY RUN

 

70 MIN EASY RUN

 

50 MIN ENDURANCE RUN


My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.1 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.3

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

6 WEEKS OUT

06

MOVE AHEAD, ADJUST GOALS.

Every run has a purpose and some runs are a big confidence boost for you. This week I’m continuing with my training program and I’m excited to be back on track. I will take the time to look ahead with confidence by hitting my stride to finish out the coming weeks strong. Making some adjustment along the way to set myself up for the best possible outcome.

 

This week I looked at snacks and gels that I will consume during the race to help fuel my body during the four hours of running.

 

A few snacks that I’ve found has helped me are bananas (Carbs + Vitamins), snack bars (protein, granola), Greek yogurt (calcium, protein, potassium), nuts , rice cakes with peanut butter (rice cakes are low in calories with carbs and peanut butter is an excellent source of protein and fats), trail mix, tuna, and a smoothie.

 

Did you know, The Exchange offers Healthier Choices, Healthier Lifestyle shelf tags making it easy for military shoppers to find BE FIT-approved snacks and drinks on more than 450 plus items for on-the-go-snacking?

Tracking my performance

6 weeks out

60 MIN EASY PACE RUN

40 MIN EASY + STRIDES

18 MILE ENDURANCE RUN

My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.0 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.2

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

5 WEEKS OUT

05

READY TO RUN

I recently came across a quote that resonated with me:

 

The man who thinks he can and the man who thinks he cannot are both right.

 

Having the mentality to believe in yourself could be the difference between failing or succeeding. As I enter the fifth week out from race day, I find myself reflecting back on the past 12 weeks and thinking of the progress I’ve made so far.

Tracking my performance

5 weeks out

 

30 MIN EASY RUN

 

70 MIN TEMPO RUN

 

20 MILE ENDURANCE RUN


My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.1 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.3

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

4 WEEKS OUT

04

HIT YOUR PEAK - IN THE LONG RUN

With race day in sight, I look towards sharpening up my training with the longest endurance runs of the season from 20 to 22 miles, this week is a great time to dial in hydration and refueling times per mile.

 

I’ve narrowed my window on intaking water/sports drink to every 4 miles and refueling from gels to every 6 miles which is roughly every hour. I understand this is a loose timeframe as I know many things can change on race day, I want to go in with a game plan to be as structured and efficient as possible.

 

Here’s a tip for anyone running your first race but may not know how to drink on the move during a marathon.

 

Via Runnersradar.com

Getting fluids in without choking, inhaling too much air or spilling most of it down your front whilst running is not an easy task! Here’s a bit of practical advice on how to overcome the issue of drinking on the move during your next marathon…

 

Starting well hydrated really helps – but that doesn’t mean drink tons of H20!

It’s important that you set off properly hydrated. This can reduce the need to drink during the run itself and it gives you a reservoir of fluids and electrolytes to draw upon when you start sweating.

 

But starting “well hydrated” definitely doesn’t just mean you should drink loads of water before a race.

 

Over-drinking can actually cause you to start with your blood electrolyte levels diluted and with a lot of fluid sloshing around in your stomach/bladder. All of which are unlikely to help you race well!

 

Master drinking at the aid stations

Most marathons have regular aid stations on the course, enabling you to run without carrying your own drinks. In major marathons these tend to be at least every 3 miles (5km), sometimes more frequently in very hot conditions. These stations tend to offer both sports drinks and water.

 

Here’s how to nail drinking on the move…

 

1) Line up on the correct side of the road

No-one benefits from a last minute sideways surge across the path of other athletes, so move across with a couple of hundred meters to spare and try to establish yourself in a gap in the traffic if you can.

 

2) Slow down for the grab, and make eye contact

Whether volunteers are handing out the drinks, or you’re taking them from a table, it’s a good idea to slow down a bit as you approach ‘the grab’. The loss of time is insignificant but it massively reduces the risk of simply spilling the drink all over the aid station workers, yourself and the pavement!

If you’re being handed a drink by another person, it’s a good idea to make eye contact with them on the approach, maybe even pointing to them to signal your intent so they know they should give the drink to you. A breathless ‘thank you’ as you run off is an optional but often appreciated gesture if you can muster the energy!

 

3) Squeeze the top of the cup to stop liquid escaping and create a funnel

More and more major events use bottled water and sports drinks on course, which makes the job of drinking on the move much simpler. But, many smaller events will still use paper cups and, if you’re not careful, taking half a dozen steps with an open cup in hand will just result in you throwing the contents all over the place.

Instead of leaving the cup open, an old pro trick is to crush the lid of the cup together to make a very narrow “funnel” opening, from which little liquid can escape, but which allows you to carefully pour some of the fluid into your mouth in a more controlled manor.

 

4) Don’t rush

Many athletes feel the need to drink the contents of whatever they pick up from an aid station within about 10 meters of collecting it. TAKE YOUR TIME!

Once you have the drink in hand, gather yourself, calm your breathing and take in small sips of fluid over a few hundred meters until you feel you have had what you need.

Do be mindful of where you end up dumping the cup or bottle (different races have different rules and clean up processes) so you’re not littering.

 

5) Dump the leftover water on your head

There are a few potential benefits to dumping water on your head, especially in hot conditions. If you end up with spare water after an aid station pickup, it may be better to dump it on your head rather than throw it away.

Doing the same with a sports drink is not recommended though, as things can get a bit sticky…

 

Make sure you rehydrate properly once you’ve finished your race.

You’ll should be able to top up on the fluids and electrolytes lost in your sweat through the food and drink you normally eat in the hours after the race.

If you struggle with cramp, or feel particularly dehydrated, some more deliberate fluid intake and sodium supplementation might be necessary.

Tracking my performance

4 weeks out

70 MIN PROGRESSION RUN

15 MILE ENDURANCE RUN

My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 158.2 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.0

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

3 WEEKS OUT

03

SHARPEN EVERY STEP

Entering the tapering phase of training, meaning reducing mileage that I’m running to allow my body to fully recover before the race and to also allow myself to reach peak performance within the race. I’ve heard that some have a hard time trusting this phase as runners tend to fear cutting back on training, since they believe doing so will hurt their performance.

 

Three weeks out and the feeling of nervousness and excitement is setting in.

 

How to Prepare in Week 1 of Your Taper via Runnersworld

 

Week 1 of the taper begins the day after your last long run of about 20 miles, three weeks before the marathon. The taper starts gradually, because this training still “counts,” and a dramatic drop in workload isn’t necessary yet.

The week before should have been your highest-mileage week. This week, stick with the same basic running schedule you’ve been following, just decrease your total mileage from last week by at least 20 percent. You should also avoid running extremely hilly courses, hill repetitions, or speed workouts, which can cause the kind of muscle tissue-damage you want to minimize during your taper.

Your shorter weekday runs shouldn’t be much different than last week’s, but shave a mile or two off your longer midweek runs. Generally, weekday training should consist of one medium long run of eight to 10 miles, one marathon-goal-pace run of four to six miles, one non-running day, and two runs of three to five miles.

Your weekend long run at the first week of your taper (two weeks before the marathon) should be a 12- to 14-miler at the same pace—not faster—as the previous week’s 20-miler.

Except for your marathon-goal-pace run, all running this week should be at a relaxed pace of one and half to two minutes slower per mile than marathon goal pace.

Tracking my performance

3 weeks out

 

60 MIN PACE RUN

17 MILE ENDURANCE RUN


My goal is to motivate and encourage you to start chasing your own goals - one step at a time. With dedication, consistency and hard work, you can develop the mindset that will ensure you can measure your progress and take action on goal setting and achieving.

 

Be Healthy, Be Strong and Run On!

Chasing 26 - IG2
Be Fit Ambassador

Roy Montez

Weight: 159.1 lbs.

Body Fat %: 9.3

Height: 6’ – 1”

Age: 34

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther

TOOLS TO HELP YOU GO FARTHER

Tools to help you go farther